Many of us have traveled to Kansas City for various reasons.  We may have gone there to see a Chiefs or Royals game.  Perhaps you took the train to Union Station.  Maybe you went to see a concert.  Maybe you went for a night on the town and had some delicious food.

The New York Times has selected a little place you may or may not be familiar with as one of it's best 2022 Favorite Restaurants.  It is called Kitty's Cafe and it has been around for 71 years.  You can reach their Facebook page HERE.

Facebook - Kitty's Cafe
Facebook - Kitty's Cafe
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The newspaper's annual list spotlights 50 restaurants across the U.S. — some new and some around for decades — that the publication is "most excited about right now." The Times had this to say about Kitty's Cafe:

This is the kind of place where a customer announces, "I think I'm going to keep it light today" before ordering a cheeseburger and fries. But the pork sandwich is really the reason you should not visit Kansas City without visiting Kitty's. Charley Soulivong, the owner since 1999, uses the recipe passed down by Kitty Kawakami, who founded the restaurant in 1951 with her husband, Paul. Those Japanese American roots survive in three tempura-battered pork cutlets that come stacked with julienne iceberg, raw onions, pickles — crunch layered with crisp — and dressed with a hot sauce that eats like spicy ketchup. Kansas City is known for destination barbecue. It ought to be better known for the Kitty's sandwich.

You can read more by clicking HERE.

Facebook - Kitty's Cafe
Facebook - Kitty's Cafe
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The Kansas City Star has written about this eatery before. And it sounds like if you like comfort food, this is a place you need to seek out.

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Any restaurant that has been in business for over 70 years has my respect.  To see some more pictures of their food, check out their Facebook page HERE.  Next time I head out to Kansas City, I plan on seeking this place out.

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