Hundreds of QAnon believers were disappointed this week (Nov. 2) when John F. Kennedy Jr., who died in 1999, did not reemerge at a Rolling Stones concert in Dallas, Texas.

Initially, the QAnon followers gathered at the location where late president John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963, believing JFK Jr. would appear and help restore Donald Trump to the White House. When JFK Jr. didn’t arrive at the expected time of 12:30PM, the people gathered at the spot began to hear rumors that JFK Jr. would instead appear at that night’s Rolling Stones concert.

“Rolling Stones? Rolling away the stone!” one QAnon follower said on a livestream, in reference to the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Another follower named Micki Larson-Olson, who arrived dressed in a Q-inspired Captain American costume, told the Dallas Morning News that she also believed JFK Sr. was alive. JFK Sr. would currently be 104 years old.

“We’ll figure that something happened in the plan that made it not safe to do it,” Larson-Olson said. “If it doesn’t go down how I believe it will, that’s OK. We’ll figure it just wasn’t the right time.”

”Frankly, I’m kind of shocked at how many people turned out for this,” Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab resident fellow Jared Holt said. “This wasn’t a widespread belief, even among QAnon followers.” Holt, who is not a QAnon follower, made it clear to Dallas Morning News that he found it concerning that so many people had been mobilized by a conspiracy theory. [via Consequence]

Journalist Michael Williams documented the early-day QAnon gathering as it happened:

The Rolling Stones played an 18-song set without incident last night. The legendary band recently lost their longtime drummer Charlie Watts, who died at age 80 earlier this year.

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